An Investigation of the Impact of Building Entrance Vestibule on Indoor Humidity Using A Calibrated Multi-Zone Model for A Small Supermarket in Hot and Humid Climate

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Daranee Jareemit
Shi Shu

Abstract

The automatically operating entrance doors in many retail buildings have been found to be main paths of air infiltration and this uncontrolled airflow through the automatic entrance doors is a significant factor of indoor moisture problems. This study proposes the calibration method to numerically investigate realistic transient indoor humidity ratios via a calibrated multi-zone model. The calibrated results is used to further calculate the amount of moisture contents transported through the automatic entrance doors with and without a vestibule in a retail building located in a hot and humid climate. The results from the calibrated model coupled with an updating adsorption mechanism agreed well with the measured humidity ratios. The indoor humidity ratio was decreased by approximately 9 percent when a door vestibule was added. The door vestibule can control indoor humidity levels within thermal comfort condition. Future studies should acquire more accurate number of occupants to reduce the uncertainty from the calculation of indoor moisture source.

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How to Cite
Jareemit, D., & Shu, S. (2014). An Investigation of the Impact of Building Entrance Vestibule on Indoor Humidity Using A Calibrated Multi-Zone Model for A Small Supermarket in Hot and Humid Climate. International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology (BUILT), 3, 23–32. https://doi.org/10.14456/built.2014.2
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